All in a day’s work – augmented reality, vehicle signage and video script writing

I don’t often post about the work I’ve been doing for BloodLines Creative – which is probably bad for business. Yet I’ve been so busy doing things, including continuing to paint in the evening hours, that I just haven’t found the time – or the energy to tout some of the recent projects I’ve been involved in.

That’s okay because business continues to roll along – never at the volume that I would prefer which would be 40+ billable hours a week – but at the end of each workday, I often wonder where did the time go.

These past few weeks I’ve been working on a new business pitch and part of our proposal involved using augmented reality. In case you’re wondering, Augmented reality (AR) is a live, direct or indirect, view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data.

In case you’d like to see it in action, here’s a little demo you can view – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SaO5tXzj58U

I won’t go into the actual applications that we were proposing but suffice it to say, it has the potential to be pretty cool – if we actually get the business.

I’ve also been involved in creating new vehicle graphics for an electrical contractor we’ve been working with via The Epstein Group. Recently, we got the opportunity to see some of the new graphics put into place on a variety of vehicles in their fleet – vans, bucket trucks, pickups and even a trailer where we wrapped the entire vehicle in graphics.

What’s really exciting is this is part of a comprehensive re-branding effort that will include a new website, print and collateral materials along with new videos.

Speaking of new videos, I’ve written a number of them recently. One for a construction company, another for a new product launch along with a series of internal award videos recognizing the collective efforts of groups or individuals.

No, I’m not naming names or showing the work as some of the projects are confidential in nature or haven’t been approved for public release.

But the work has been both fun and rewarding. And I continue to learn new things and new tactics to utilize in the ever-changing world of advertising and marketing communications.

Regardless of the tactic, they still take smart, strategic thinking in order to stand out, get noticed and acted upon.

Big Ideas Start Here.

BloodLines Creative provides Big Idea Thinking to a wide variety of consumer, B2B and government-related and not-for-profit accounts. The work we do ranges from individual projects to full-scale advertising and marketing communications across all media. If you’re looking for something out-of-the-ordinary, then resist the ordinary. Give us a call at 314.973.9197 today.

Drunk on America

When I first heard that A-B InBev was renaming its flagship brand, Budweiser to America for the summer and right on through to the election in November, I thought it was a joke.

I honestly can’t believe that here I am blogging again about Budweiser. Just a few posts ago, I was writing about how angry their ads had gotten, taking an in-your-face attitude to new extremes.

Now, this Belgian-owned company is doing the ultimate act of American commercialism, jumping on the patriotic bandwagon in their effort to sell more beer.

America beer.

Talk about a brand that has lost its way.

You can’t say that the folks at A-B-InBev are doing this to get us all to rally ’round the flag. Putting the Star Spangled banner on a can isn’t exactly a fitting tribute to Francis Scott Key. Sadly, in this day and age, I’ll bet the majority of Americans don’t even know what “E Pluribus Unum” even means or where it originated. Perhaps a few bar conversations might elicit the answer but I’m betting it doesn’t begin a new age of enlightenment about American history.

It’s all about selling beer and Budweiser, or, starting May 23rd, America, is fighting a losing battle. According to Market Watch, “In 1988, Budweiser sold 50 million barrels on its own, making up 25% of all beer sold in the U.S. It has lost more than 70% of its sales since that time and, back in 2011, was knocked into third place among beer brands by Coors Light. It now accounts for just 7% of the U.S. market.”

Donald Trump says he wants to make America great again – but this brand of America is on the decline, getting kicked around by the same craft beers that Budweiser has bashed in recent commercials.

I don’t think the in-your-face attitude is going to fly in their efforts to sell America. Instead, I’m expecting some syrupy, idyllic slice-of-life showing the great times had by all consuming America at backyard bar-b-ques, 4th of July celebrations and sporting events from baseball games to the Olympics. All in an effort to sell more beer.

Maybe they’re hoping that everyone will buy a six pack of America just so we can sit it on the shelf as a collector’s item and shake our heads at the audacity that Carlos Brito is now allowing to be launched from sea to shining sea.

First he does a hostile takeover of Anheuser-Busch. Then he comes in, cuts costs, jobs and puts pressure on suppliers – from rice grain to beechwood to the printing and packaging industry, forcing companies to accept 90-day and in some cases 120-day payments for services rendered. Ah, that’s the American way.

No, it’s not.

I know a lot of people who still work for the brewery. I know a lot of other people who have lost a lot of business ever since the Belgian takeover took place.

Maybe America will be a marketing success.

I’m sure it’s been focus group tested and when quizzed, people still respond that they love America.

I just find it wrong for a company that is now foreign-owned to try and sell beer by putting our country’s name, founding thoughts, and heritage onto a label.

When Chevrolet did it with their, “America loves baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet” it was kind of cute and iconic. When other brands salute the Olympics and play on Americana, it’s to be expected – particularly since many of those companies are helping through sponsorships. But no company (especially a foreign-owned one) has ever done anything quite as blatant as this.

America. I’m not buying it.

 

 

 

 

 

Powerball dreams and reality – circa 2016

My soon-to-be winning Powerball ticket.

My soon-to-be winning Powerball ticket.

Back in November of 2012, I posted the following on my blog. The odds have changed. There are more numbers now – which is how it has grown to more than a billion. We live in magical times, don’t we – where you can get millions of Americans to drop $10, $20 some people even way more than that – for a roughly 1 in 292.2 million to one chance that you’ll end up with the winning ticket.

There are Powerball dreams and there is reality. It’s 2016. If you change the amount of the drawing, your odds of winning and the topics of the day to missed field goals, El Chapo and David Bowie leaving ground control then everything else is still fairly pertinent.

November 27, 2012 … With no hurricanes bearing down on the east coast and lacking any current national disasters or tragedies, the media has momentarily shifted its attention to Wednesday’s upcoming $425 million Powerball drawing. http://www.powerball.com/pb_home.asp

All across the country, reporters are heading out to remote gas stations and convenience stores and interviewing people who are now waiting in line to purchase their Powerball tickets. Fresh after Black Friday, they’re now ready to plunk down a few dollars to give them something to dream about, at least until they wake up Thursday morning and find out they didn’t win.

After all, you can’t win if you don’t play, right?

Of course, odds are extremely good that you won’t win even if you do play. The official odds say the chances of winning are 1 in 175,223,510. I read elsewhere that it’s actually closer to 1 in 195,200,000 when you factor in that there isn’t always a winner – but hey, what’s an extra 20 million or so really matter?

Americans don’t really care that Powerball is one of the worst investments on the planet. Some people play every week, others wait for the jackpot to go over $100 million before purchasing a ticket. And when the numbers reach above $200 million, the media comes out to feed the frenzy.

With all that in mind, I thought I’d do my part by passing on a little knowledge I gleamed in my 15 minutes worth of research. All of the following info comes from an article I read based off of Gail Howard’s Lotto Strategy Book, Lottery Master Guide. http://www.smartluck.com/lottery-master-guide.htm

So before you go out and purchase your lottery ticket, you may want to keep the following thoughts in mind.

First off, if you’re doing Quick Picks, you have just as good a chance at winning as you do if you’re picking your own numbers. So purchase away. If you’re going to make your own picks, here’s Gail’s advice.

Choosing all odd numbers or all even numbers rarely happens – only about 4% of the time. Your best mix is 3 odds and 2 evens or 2 odds and 3 evens and then toss in the PowerBall number to balance them out.

All high numbers or all low numbers are also rarely drawn – again, only about 4% of the time. So don’t do that.

Avoid betting five consecutive numbers – it’s never happened. Four consecutive numbers has only happened a handful of times since the drawing began. Even three consecutive numbers is a rarity.

Avoid betting one lotto group – like picking all numbers in the teens. Probably not gonna happen.

Avoid pattern betting – like forming a cross with your picks or picking the four corners and the middle – even if they do win, hundreds, perhaps thousands of clever individuals will have had the same thought.

Avoid number multiples – 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 – again, you won’t be the only one with this brilliant idea so you’ll be sharing the riches.

Avoid all same last digits – 7, 17, 27, 37, 47 – same reason as above.

Some people like to pick birthdays and that’s fine but don’t forget to toss in one or two numbers above 31 just to make sure you’re covered.

Gail has one other guiding rule that makes sense to me: That which is most possible happens MOST OFTEN. That which is least possible happens LEAST OFTEN.

With that in mind, here’s a list of Powerball numbers that have won the most since last January:

guide.htmhttp://www.powerball.com/powerball/pb_frequency.asp

If you’re going to buy tickets in a group, ask everyone if they feel lucky. If the individual says, “I never win anything,” ask him or her to get out of the group – those negative vibes will drag you all down.

With all that in mind, I’m going to take a 45-minute trip to the outskirts of St. Louis, find some hole-in-the wall liquor store and purchase my winning ticket based on my carefully chosen criteria for number selection.

On second thought, I never win anything so I’m automatically disqualified.

Good luck and if you win based on any of the above advice, please pass on some of your winnings to me and I’ll make sure Gail gets a cut, too!

Okay, Stan, you win

(Photo by Chris Lee, clee@post-dispatch.com)

(Photo by Chris Lee, clee@post-dispatch.com)

As a long-time St. Louis Rams season ticket holder, I have seen a lot of lows over the past decade. Dropped passes. Offsides after offsides. Interceptions, fumbles, missed tackles, games that were over before half time – the list goes on and on.

The futility never seems to end. Our draft picks, as a rule, are generally a bust. Free agency signings have been awful. Trades go south. Players get concussions and stay in to give away games. Other players get concussions, get sent back in and then get removed again, concussed by their own teammates.

St. Louis is guaranteed, once again, that we will not have a winning football season.

It’s all a broken record. It’s David Byrne, singing, “Same as it ever was” over and over and over.

This weekend, walking in to the fabulous Edward Jones Dome, it felt more like we were on our way to a funeral than an NFL game. And in a way we were.

The Rams days here in St. Louis are numbered. Coach Fisher says if you think the players have given up, “you can kiss my ass”.

Bottoms up, Jeff. They’ve given up.

Firing your offensive coordinator is only going to lead to more penalties, more botched plays, more offsides.

It’s all playing out exactly how Rams owner Stan Kroenke hoped it would.

Hire a lifetime under .500 coach. Stop all communication with the city and refuse to speak to any reporters. Make the fan base loathe you.

Congrats. You win.

We loathe you.

We’re tired of watching this sad sack of a team.

When they put up the “Make some noise” message on that pathetic scoreboard that has to be among the worst in the NFL, it’s all a joke. There is no reason to make any noise.

I was bummed when we went for it on 4th and 2 from the whatever yard line we were on in the 4th quarter. I knew there was no way the Rams would get a first down. I wanted to cheer another 3 points, watching the team double its output for the day.

They failed.

It’s all so unfair.

Stan Kroenke should be docked pay. He should be penalized for mismanagement. Instead, he’s going to make out like a bandit, earning millions upon millions when he moves this sorry franchise back to Los Angeles. And we’re going to be stuck with a dome, trying to book tractor pulls and indoor rodeos while we wait for spring training to roll around.

Stan wins. We lose.

And I’ll say it again. It’s just not fair.

My not so unique selling proposition

Big Idea Thinking is why I get up in the morning.

Big Idea Thinking is why I get up in the morning.

 

Big Ideas Start Here.

That’s been the theme line of BloodLines Creative ever since I began this business and it’s true – they really do start here.

Of course, I don’t have a monopoly on the creation of big ideas. They can come from anywhere and there are all sorts of agencies and design firms here in St. Louis and around the world that could say the same thing. Expand that to all sorts of businesses and companies and these days, you have to include the power of the individual to be a walking, talking think tank as well. So is this a unique selling proposition? Probably not.

Still, ideas are what I sell and I truly believe in the power of the big idea – something that connects with the individuals you’re targeting.

There are so many ways to connect with people these days. Which also means there are so many ways you can completely miss connecting with them. Tweets and posts come and go. Commercials are easily ignored or never even seen – completely tuned out or turned off because there is simply too much information.

How do you cut through it all?

You have to know your customer – more so now, than perhaps ever before. That’s no easy task, especially to clients that don’t have vast sums of money to spend.

It takes big idea thinking. And it takes a client who is willing to take that flying leap of faith to do something out of the ordinary.

I have been fortunate to be engaged with a wide assortment of clients who not only are expecting me to deliver big ideas, they are demanding it. I’ve been even more fortunate to continue working with some truly talented individuals who do amazing work and have joined forces with a brand new network of talent, not just here but across the pond in London as well.

We’re all working as one to find innovative ways to get our client’s message out and in some cases, almost completely build their audience, as we seek to turn them from mere customers into brand advocates.

So though the theme line of BloodLines Creative may not be the most original line ever crafted, it’s still on point.

If your business or organization could benefit from some big idea thinking I offer two words of advice: start here.

 

 

To blog or not to blog?

 

I was amazed when I searched images to find that this headline had been done about 500 times before.

I was amazed when I searched images to find that this headline had been done about 500 times before.

When I originally began this blog more than 300 posts and nearly 100,000 viewers ago, I was fired up and pronounced that I was ready to do great things.

I still am.

I’ve written about a wide variety of topics, focusing primarily on advertising and marketing communications which is how I earn my living. Yet the most readership I’ve gotten through the many posts I’ve done has generally not had anything to do with those topics.

The potential merger of St. Louis city and county has drawn the most interest. That’s good, I guess.

I remain a firm believer that there should be a merger, that the current divide is harming our region and that we’ll never really capitalize on our true potential unless we join forces to address the variety of issues that need to be dealt with and eliminate the needless bureaucracy, fiefdoms and petty politics that continue to put a slow stranglehold on this region.

Other posts I’ve written that have drawn many views and elicited quite a few comments range from the glory days of Kenrick Advertising to the Rams leaving town to the loss of my dad this past December.

I’ve tried to position myself as a thought leader in the wonderful world of advertising and marketing communications.

But I’d be the first to admit that I’ve been playing catch-up to the ever-expanding digital and social media whirlwind that has hit traditional means of communications and knocked them down for a ten-count. Though I’ve made great strides in my knowledge base, new technologies and user platforms emerge on a daily basis. If you think you’re on top of something one day, you’re behind the next.

But one thing remains unchanged no matter how it’s being delivered: the simple ability to communicate.

These days, it’s more important than ever to develop your brand personality and connect with your audience in ways that are honest and true to what you’re all about.

I love to write.

I love to tell stories.

I have tried to assess the amount of business I’ve gotten through writing these blog posts. Directly, I know it led to one piece of business that has long since come and gone.

But people know I’m out there. Those who have read these posts know that I am capable of putting together a sentence or two that somehow leads you from Point A to Point B though I have a strong tendency to take detours and on occasion, run directly into roadblocks.

I’ll keep writing.

Business has been very good recently. I don’t think there’s any correlation to the work I’ve been doing and the blog posts I’ve been posting (or more recently, not posting).

If you’re still reading, you’re the reason that the answer to the initial question is this: blog.

 

 

We’ve heard this Monsanto story before

Monsanto isn’t going anywhere. Right?

How are we to know?

Quite frankly, we don’t. Maybe the recent news of their effort to purchase Swiss-based Syngenta AG won’t result in them going any further than their new Chesterfield campus. They have, after all, committed to spend more than $1 billion to their Chesterfield location and that certainly doesn’t sound like a company that’s going to up and leave the region.

Still, it makes you wonder.

According to an article in today’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger is, “looking at this with optimism.”

What else can you do other than try and be optimistic?

Sure, Monsanto has been a part of the St. Louis business community since 1901. That may pale next to Anheuser-Busch and their 1852 beginnings but it’s still some pretty serious roots in St. Louis.

And if there’s any company that should have an understanding of roots, you’d think it would be Monsanto.

Fortunately, Monsanto is the one seeking to do the buying, expanding their ability to focus on issues facing farmers challenged with feeding the world’s growing population.The company supplies approximately 90% of the world’s GMO (genetically modified organism) seeds. I’m not sure how Syngenta fits into that plan – they also are a biotech company that conducts genomic research. And genetically modified crops have certainly been under fire.

Geoff Whittington, of Next StL writes, “GMO technology is highly controversial and has many detractors. A major 2008 UN /World Bank-sponsored report compiled by 400 scientists and endorsed by 58 countries concluded that genetically modified crops have little to offer to the challenges of poverty, hunger, and climate change. The report recommended organic farming as the sustainable way forward for developing countries. Additionally, the United States is the only developed country in the world that does not have mandatory GMO labeling laws.”

World population growth continues to expand. Conditions for growing crops don’t appear to be improving. Something’s got to be done and the solution is far from simple.

If Monsanto wants to change their name to Mongenta or SynSanto, that’s fine by me. If they want to move from their Creve Coeur campus a little further west to Chesterfield, that’s still good for the St. Louis region and perhaps the Creve Coeur campus could become a new hub for more biotechnology and research-based companies.

Illinois Senator Dick Durbin thinks the whole potential Syngenta acquisition is all about Monsanto incorporating overseas in order to avoid paying U.S. taxes.

Maybe. Maybe not. I don’t know if he’d be saying such a thing if Monsanto were based out of Peoria.

For now, they’re based out of St. Louis – Creve Coeur/Chestefield – it doesn’t matter.

As long as they don’t end up in Switzerland.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution takes a shot at St. Louis

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution says St. Louis is a bust.

St. Louis was compared to the boom city of Chicago in an-going series in the newspaper’s year-long series concerning the economic state of Atlanta.

Basically, the gist of the story is: Atlanta needs to work to get better or we could end up being like the racially divided city of St. Louis and its abundance of accompanying municipalities that make up St. Louis County’s ineffective and wasteful government bureaucracies.

There’s a video that I found fascinating to watch as well.

http://www.myajc.com/videos/news/atlanta-forward-a-look-at-st-louis/vDNy3S/?icmp=AJC_internallink_122014_rightrail_AJChpmyAJCbox

Here, the author of the story gives a little history of how St. Louis has basically been on a downward spiral ever since the renowned city planner, Harlan Bartholomew, helped fuel the exodus from St. Louis city to the county as well as contributed mightily to the region’s fragmentation and racism.

I’m a lifelong St. Louisan and didn’t know that I grew up in such a sorry state of decline.

It’s interesting that none of the speakers in the video are identified – and the story was heavily slanted to show nothing but St. Louis’ dark side. Still, I think many of the points made in both the article and the video are on point.

There are 91 municipalities in St. Louis County or, if you prefer, 91 kingdoms.

A kingdom protects itself. It needs to feed itself. It sets its own rules and rarely does it look out for others outside of the kingdom.

Those who enter the kingdom are subject to the rules of that kingdom, including 20 MPH speed limits.

I’m not sure where Champ, Edmundson, Flordell Hills or Velda City are even located with their respective populations of 13, 834, 822 and 1,420 proud citizens – but they’re somewhere in the confines of St. Louis County and they each have their own elected officials and local ordinances.

For quite some time, I’ve been a firm believer that St. Louis City and County need to unite – combine our forces, address our problems and begin thinking and acting on behalf of this whole region.

I know that is way oversimplified.

The question is, if it’s so obvious to outsiders, why can’t we see it ourselves?

Better yet, why can’t we do something about it?

I know people are trying.

We’ve got to try harder.

We’ve got to turn things around and go from bust back to boom.

 

 

What wearables are you wearing?

“So what’s a wearable?” you ask.

For many people, myself included, it’s a Fitbit – one of those bands that wrap around your wrist that measure your steps each day – and if you want it to, the number of calories you take in, the number burned, the hours you sleep and even how well you slept. And that’s just for starters.

Fitbits are getting more and more advanced. They need to – because the market is getting more and more crowded with wearable technology.

Currently, there are close to 300 different wearable technology products in the marketplace. Plenty more are on the way.

Apple is getting closer to launching its Apple Watch – perhaps as soon as later this spring and then we’ll have a whole new set of Dick Tracy imitators talking to their wrists to communicate where they are and what they’re doing and using their wearable to pay the bill, text their friends, measure their heart rate and tell them whether they should go left or right at the next corner to find their way to whatever uber-hip place they’re heading to next.

Cell phones will become so yesterday.

Well, not for a little while at least as you actually have to have an Apple smartphone in order for your Apple Watch to function beyond merely being a watch.

It’s weird. Cell phones made wearing watches seem obsolete as all you had to do was check your phone to see what time it is and these days, it seems no one goes anywhere without their phone in hand or at least in pocket. Now the cell phone may get wiped out by the watch. Which will in turn be made obsolete by some other form of communication.

Google is still trying to recover from their soft launch of Google Glass – the eyewear that allowed you to video what you were seeing, or take photos, get directions or a variety of other tasks – all while wearing a very weird looking set of glasses that didn’t really function as glasses – in fact, if you wear glasses, you wouldn’t be able to wear Google glasses at the same time.

My first look at Google Glass reminded me of the Steve Martin movie, “The Jerk” where he turned into a millionaire thanks to the invention of his Opti-Grab glasses – that ultimately caused the wearers to become cross-eyed.

I could see similar things happening with Google Glass – with them somehow causing your right eyeball to endlessly look up and to the right or perhaps there might be all sorts of lawsuits emerging because people were checking their emails while walking into open sewer holes or wiping out trying to record what it’s like to go cliff diving or hang gliding or whatever.

It’s interesting that the early wearers of Google Glass were called Glassholes.

It’s not easy to be an early adopter.

Rest assured, though, Google will figure it out. And soon, we’ll all be wearing something that measures our heart rate, our steps, our breathing, our pulse, our caloric intake and that provides directions, advice, reviews and instant contact with all our many, many friends on LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest, SnapChat, twitter, flickr, digg, stumbleupon, reddit, mixx, gather, diigo, newsvine, connectedy and whatever other social network we use to avoid actual human interaction.

We live in a connected world.

If only we could all get back to connecting one-on-one with people.

No wearable device necessary.

Information contained in this post came from an article written by Sam McMillan in the March/April 2015 edition of Communication Arts magazine and from numerous Google searches.

 

 

Dipping our toes in the ADDY awards waters

For those who toil daily in the wonderful world of advertising and marketing communications, the ADDY awards in St. Louis have a way of melting away the new fallen snow.

Well, not really.

Still, the ADDYs are a chance for area agencies to shine and yes, on occasion, an in-house marketing team manages to get in the game.

That’s the case this year with McCarthy Building Companies, Inc.

Our Corporate Communications team has created some very strong work in a variety of categories. Print ads, videos, e-cards, iPad apps, direct mail – it’s been an honor to work on such a wide variety of materials and be part of a collaborative team that works as one each and every day.

Overall, we had three entries we thought were ADDY-worthy.

One was for our mccarthy150.com website, celebrating McCarthy’s 150th anniversary. Though we’re now in our 151st year, the site is still live and attracting new visitors daily.

The second piece we entered was our holiday e-card which also played off of our 150th anniversary. This one can be found at mccarthyholiday.com – and was one of the most fun projects I’ve worked on in my entire career. The idea was to offer up 150 Fun Things to do for the Holidays.

Easier said than done.

The first 70 or so items came pretty easily. Once we got the list over 100, it became a bit more of a struggle and it was during that time that we really began to get creative. Wearing holiday socks on the outside of your pants or going door-to-door caroling singing songs that have nothing to do with the holidays were just a few of the more random bizarre things we came up with. You can view them all if you visit the site.

The last piece we entered was the McCarthy app (mccarthy.com/app). The app is unlike anything I’ve ever been involved with before. Think of it as a magazine on steroids where the articles have embedded video and you can enlarge key graphics, click on links that open up more info and generally, takes you on an interactive journey into the world of McCarthy.

So those were our three entries that we thought had a good chance of becoming an ADDY finalist. Unfortunately, the judges disagreed as the McCarthy app was the only one of our entries that made it in as a finalist. Still, that’s not bad.

Bat .333 in the MLB and you’re on your way to the Hall of Fame.

We entered the same three pieces in another competition called The AVA Awards (AVAawards.com) – recognizing excellence in digital marketing. All three pieces were winners – one Platinum Award and two Golds. The AVA Awards had more than 2400 entries that came from across the U.S. and with a number of international entries as well. About 300 awards in total were given out so we felt like we were in pretty select company and when you view some of the winners from previous year’s (this year’s entries haven’t been posted yet), there is some really nice work.

So even though we only have one ADDY finalist, we’re still excited to be a part of it all. The St. Louis advertising and marketing community has taken its fair share of hits the past few years. Broadcast seems to be a thing of the past. And big budgets have gone the way of the big budget advertisers – they’ve left the community.

Still, the work that is being done in St. Louis is strong. There is a tremendous talent base here and call me crazy, but I’m still a firm believer that St. Louis’ glory days are ahead of us. But we all have to push. We all have to work hard to excel in what we do and do a better job of luring top talent to this market.

There’s a lot of work that still needs to be done to make that happen.

Let’s make it happen.

Let’s GrOw St. Louis.